Star Light, Star Bright

Actually seeing the stars tonight!

After many days of much needed rain, the gloomy grey cloud cover cracked open this afternoon and the sun shone onto our soggy part of the world.  Joyfully.  Warmly. There was great rejoicing.

The maintenance guys also came by and fixed our heat.  Yay heat!  Much appreciated, guys!

Overall, it was a lurvley afternoon and evening.  Still nomming on the ribs that Mum decided would be Christmas dinner this year, my fridge currently full of leftovers.

What did you guys have for Christmas dinner?  Traditional, modern, or an eclectic mix just your own?

I have a friend whose family picks a country at random every year, and then does traditional foods of the chosen country for Christmas dinner.  Great idea, but not going to happen here with only 1 person to cook!  😛

Today’s blogging will be, instead of food, about stars and imagination, and heavenly bodies 🙂  I know I have one, it’s just hiding behind the cookies!

Today is the birthday of German astronomer Johannes Kepler.

He was born in Weil der Stadt, Württemberg in 1571, and intended to become a theologian.  He was sidetracked when he read Copernicus’s Six Books Concerning the Revolutions of the Heavenly Orbs, in which Copernicus posits that the planets revolve around the Sun, not the Earth.

Kepler saw Copernicus’s theory as evidence of a divine blueprint for the universe, and set out to prove the theories through scientific observation. Over his lifetime, Kepler came up with three laws of planetary motion stating:

1.  That the planets travel in elliptical orbits around the Sun.

2.  The planet (Earth) moves faster during the portion of its orbit that is closest to the Sun.

3.  A description of  the mathematical relationship between the distance of a planet from the Sun and the length of the planet’s orbital period.

Pretty genius stuff for the Middle Ages.  His contemporaries were busy wiping out cats…because they helped witches communicate with the Devil.  Never mind the cats (good kittehs) killed rats, and held the plague at bay.  Irony, right?

Kepler was also the father of modern optics. He had poor vision himself, as a result of a childhood case of smallpox. He was the first scientist to describe the mechanics of vision in the eye, and developed lenses to correct nearsightedness and farsightedness.

He also explained how both eyes work together to produce depth perception.

Good to know, right?

200th Comment!

Wow!  I can’t believe that you guys keep coming back…but I’m happy that you do!  🙂

At Groovy Noms, I received my 200th comment…from The Queen!

I feel like Sally Fields, as in “You like me, you really like me!”.

Thanks for reading, and letting me know what you think.  Input IS appreciated.  😀

Kitchen Kat says thanks, too!

He looks angry, but he’s not.  He’s just waiting for me to go back in the kitchen…